FAQs

Do you have questions?  We can help!  You will find the answers to several frequently asked mortgage questions below.

 

How do I know if I am ready to buy a home?

 

How much home can I afford?

 

How do I make an offer?

 

What is earnest money?  How much should I set aside?

 

What is ‘loan to value’ (LTV) and how does it determine the size of my loan?

 

What types of loans are available and what are the advantages of each?

 

How do I choose the best loan program for me?

 

When do Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) make sense?

 

Can I pay off my loan ahead of schedule?

 

Are there special mortgages for first-time homebuyers? 

 

How large of a down payment do I need?

 

What is included in a monthly mortgage payment?

 

How does the interest rate factor in securing a mortgage loan?

 

What happens if interest rates decrease and I have a fixed-rate loan?

 

What are discount points?

 

What is an escrow account?  Do I need one?

 

What steps need to be taken to secure a loan?

 

How can I find information about my credit history? 

 

What is a credit bureau score and how do lenders use them?

 

What is a good faith estimate and how does it help me?

 

What responsibilities do I have during the lending process? 

 

What happens after I've applied for my loan?

 

What are pre-paid expenses and closing costs?

 

What can I expect on closing day?

 

What do I get at closing?

 

How do I know if I am ready to buy a home?

You are probably ready to buy your own home if you can answer ‘yes’ to these questions:

  • Do I have a steady source of income (usually a job)?
  • Have I been employed on a regular basis for the last 2-3 years?
  • Is my current income reliable? Do I have a good record of paying my bills?
  • Do I have few outstanding long-term debts (like car payments)?
  • Do I have money saved for a down payment?
  • Am I able to pay a mortgage every month, plus additional costs? 

TOP 

 

How much home can I afford?

It's simple.  Ask a Capstone loan officer to pre-qualify you.  When pre-qualifying your loan, we will consider your debt-to-income ratio, which is a comparison of your gross (pre-tax) income to housing and non-housing expenses.  Non-housing expenses include such long-term debts as car or student loan payments and alimony or child support.  According to the FEDERAL HOUSING AUTHORITY (FHA), monthly mortgage payments should be no more than 31% of gross income, while the mortgage payment combined with non-housing expenses should total no more than 43% of your income.  A lender will also consider cash available for down payment, closing costs, and credit history when determining your maximum loan amount.

 

TOP 

 

How do I make an offer?

Your real estate agent will assist you in making an offer, which will include:

  • Complete legal description of the property
  • Amount of earnest money
  • Down payment and financing details
  • Proposed move-in date
  • Price you are offering
  • Proposed closing date
  • Length of time the offer is valid
  • Details of the deal
  • Contingencies such as mortgage and inspections

Success depends on negotiating a satisfactory contract with the seller, not just making an offer.

 

TOP 

 

What is earnest money?  How much should I set aside?

Earnest money is money put down to demonstrate your seriousness about buying a home.  If your offer is accepted, the earnest money becomes part of your down payment or closing costs.  If the offer is rejected, your money is returned to you.  If you back out of a deal, you may forfeit the entire amount.

 

TOP 

 

What is ‘loan to value’ (LTV) and how does it determine the size of my loan?

The loan to value ratio is the amount of money you borrow compared with the price or appraised value of the home you are purchasing.  Each loan has a specific LTV limit.  For example: With a 95% LTV loan on a home priced at $200,000, you could borrow up to $194,000 (97% of $200,000); and would have to pay $6,000 as a down payment.

 

TOP 

 

What types of loans are available and what are the advantages of each?

With a fixed-rate mortgage, the interest rate stays the same during the life of the loan.  With an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), the interest changes periodically, typically in relation to an index.  While the monthly payments that you make with a fixed-rate mortgage are relatively stable, payments on an ARM loan will likely change.  There are advantages and disadvantages to each type of mortgage, and the best way to select a loan product that’s right for you is by talking to a Capstone loan officer.  For a comparison among various loan programs, check out Capstone’s informative chart, Loan Programs.

 

TOP 

 

How do I choose the best loan program for me?

Your personal situation will determine the best kind of loan for you.  Your loan choice depends on a number of factors, including your current financial needs & objectives, and how long you intend to keep your house.  A Capstone Loan officer can help you evaluate your choices and assist you in determining which loan makes the most sense based on your unique requirements.

 

TOP 

 

When do Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) make sense?

An ARM may make sense if:

  • You are confident that your income will increase steadily over the years.
  • You anticipate a move in the near future and aren't concerned about potential increases in interest rates.

TOP 

 

Can I pay off my loan ahead of schedule?

Yes.  By sending more money each month or making an extra payment at the end of the year, you can accelerate the process of paying off the loan.  When you send extra money, be sure to indicate that the excess payment is to be applied to the principal.  Most lenders allow loan prepayment, though you may have to pay a prepayment penalty.  Ask a Capstone Loan officer for details.

 

TOP 

 

Are there special mortgages for first-time homebuyers?

There are several affordable mortgage options which can help first-time homebuyers overcome obstacles.  Capstone frequently assists borrowers who:

  • Don't have a lot of money saved for the down payment and closing costs
  • Have no (or a poor) credit history
  • Have substantial long-term debt
  • Have experienced income irregularities  

TOP 

 

How large of a down payment do I need?

Some mortgage options require a down payment of 3.5% or less of the purchase price.  Remember, the larger the down payment, the less you have to borrow and the more equity you'll have.  Mortgages with less than a 20% down payment generally require a mortgage insurance policy to secure the loan.  When considering the size of your down payment, consider that you'll also need money for closing costs, moving expenses, repairs, and decorating.

 

TOP

 

What is included in a monthly mortgage payment?

The monthly mortgage payment mainly pays off principal and interest.  Typically, your mortgage will also include local real estate taxes, homeowner's insurance, and mortgage insurance (if applicable).

 

TOP 

 

How does the interest rate factor in securing a mortgage loan?

A lower interest rate allows you to borrow more money than a high rate with the same monthly payment.  Interest rates can fluctuate as you shop for a loan, so ask a Capstone Loan officer about a rate ‘lock-in’ (which guarantees a specific interest rate for a certain period of time).  The Annual Percentage Rate (APR) shows the cost of a mortgage loan by expressing it in terms of a yearly interest rate.  The APR is generally higher than the note rate because it also includes the cost of points, mortgage insurance, and other fees included in the loan (but mortgage payments are calculated on the note rate).

 

TOP 

 

What happens if interest rates decrease and I have a fixed-rate loan?

If interest rates drop significantly, you may want to refinance.  Most experts agree that if you plan to be in your house for at least 18 months and you can get a rate 1% less than your current one, refinancing may be a good option.  Refinancing may however, involve paying many of the same fees paid at the original closing, plus origination & application fees.

 

TOP 

 

What are discount points?

Discount points allow you to lower your interest rate.  They are essentially prepaid interest, with each point equaling 1% of the total loan amount.  Generally, for each point paid on a 30-year mortgage, the interest rate is reduced by 1/4 (or .25) of a percentage point.  When shopping for your loan, ask a Capstone Loan officer about an interest rate with zero points and assistance in determining how much the rate decreases with each point paid.  Discount points may make sense if you plan to stay in a home for some time, since they can lower the monthly loan payment.  Points are tax deductible when you purchase a home.  You may be able to negotiate for the seller to pay for a portion of your points.

 

TOP 

 

What is an escrow account?  Do I need one?

Established by your lender, an escrow account is a place to set aside a portion of your monthly mortgage payment to cover annual charges for homeowner's insurance, mortgage insurance (if applicable), and property taxes.  Escrow accounts are a good idea because they assure money will always be available for these payments.

 

TOP 

 

What steps need to be taken to secure a loan? 

The first step in securing a loan is to complete a loan application.  To do so, you'll need the following information or documents:

  • Pay stubs for the past month
  • W-2 forms for the past 2 years
  • Recent bank statements- all pagers of all accounts for the past 2 months
  • Tax returns for the past 2 years
  • Proof of any other income
  • Address and description of the property you wish to buy
  • Sales contract

During the application process, your Capstone Loan officer will order a report on your credit history and a professional appraisal of the property you want to purchase.  The application process typically takes 1-6 weeks.

 

TOP 

 

 

How can I find information about my credit history?

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide consumer reporting companies – Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion – to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months.  The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation's consumer protection agency, has prepared a brochure, Your Access to Free Credit Reports, explaining your rights under the FCRA.

 

 

You can order your free annual credit report online at annualcreditreport.com, by calling 1.877.322.8228, or by completing the Annual Credit Report Request Form and mailing it to:

 

 

Annual Credit Report Request Service
P.O. Box 10528
Atlanta, GA 30348-5281

 

 

Once you receive the report, it's important to verify its accuracy.  Double check the high credit limit’, ‘total loan’, and ‘past due’ columns.  It's a good idea to get copies from all three companies to assure there are no mistakes since any of the three could be providing a report to your lender.

 

 

Contact the credit reporting companies at the numbers listed below for more information:

Experian: 1.888.397.3742
Equifax: 1.800.997.2493
Trans Union: 1.800.888.4213

 

 

 


TOP

 

What is a credit bureau score and how do lenders use them?

A credit bureau score is a number (based upon your credit history) that represents the possibility that you will be unable to repay a loan.  It is used it to determine your ability to qualify for a mortgage loan.  The better the score, the better your chances are of getting a loan.  Ask a Capstone Loan officer for details.

 

TOP 

 

What is a good faith estimate and how does it help me?

It is an estimate that lists all fees paid before closing, all closing costs, and any escrow costs you will encounter when purchasing a home.  Your Capstone Loan officer will supply it within three business days of your application so that you can make accurate judgments when shopping for a loan.

 

TOP 

 

What responsibilities do I have during the lending process?

Be sure to follow all of these steps as you apply for a loan:

  • Read and understand everything before signing
  • Do not overstate income
  • Do not overstate length of employment
  • Do not overstate assets
  • Accurately report debts
  • Do not change your income tax returns for any reason
  • Tell the whole truth about gifts
  • Be truthful about credit problems, past and present
  • Be honest about your intention to occupy the house
  • Do not provide false supporting documents  

TOP 

 

What happens after I've applied for my loan?

Your loan application will be evaluated immediately.  Completing the evaluation of your application usually takes about 4 weeks.  You may be asked for more information once the application has been submitted.  The sooner you can provide the information the faster your application will be processed.  Once all the information has been verified, your Capstone Loan officer will call you to let you know the outcome of your application.  If the loan is approved, a closing date is set up and your Capstone Loan officer will review the closing with you.  After closing, you'll be able to move into your new home!

 

TOP 

 

What are pre-paid expenses and closing costs?

There may be closing costs customary or unique to a certain locality, but closing costs are usually made up of the following:

  • Attorney's or escrow fees
  • Property taxes (to cover tax period to date)
  • Interest (paid from date of closing to 30 days before monthly payment)
  • Loan Origination fee
  • Recording fees
  • Survey fee
  • Title Insurance
  • Loan points (if applicable)
  • First payment to escrow account for future real estate taxes and insurance
  • Lenders fees for underwriting
  • Appraisal fee
  • Credit Report  

TOP 

 

What can I expect on closing day?

You will present your paid homeowner's insurance policy or a binder and receipt showing that the premium has been paid.  The closing agent will then list the money you owe the seller (remainder of down payment, prepaid taxes, etc.) and the money the seller owes you (unpaid taxes and prepaid rent, if applicable).  The seller will provide proofs of any inspection, warranties, etc.

Once you're sure you understand all of the documentation, you'll sign the mortgage, agreeing that if you do not make payments the lender is entitled to sell your property and apply the sale price against the amount you owe plus expenses.  You'll also sign a mortgage note, promising to repay the loan.  The seller will give you the title to the house in the form of a signed deed.

You'll pay the lender's attorney all closing costs and, in turn, he or she will provide you with a settlement statement of all the times for which you have paid.  The deed and mortgage will then be recorded in the state Registry of Deeds and you will be a homeowner.

 

TOP 

 

What do I get at closing?

Settlement Statement, HUD-1 Form is given at or before closing. If you want a copy prior to closing for review, you must request it from the closing agent.

  • A complete package of all papers you signed including copy of the Truth-In Lending Statement
  • Copy of Mortgage Note
  • Copy of Mortgage or Deed of Trust
  • Binding Sales Contract (prepared by the seller; your lawyer should review it)
  • Keys to your new home

TOP

Do you have questions?  We can help!  You will find the answers to several frequently asked mortgage questions below.

 

How do I know if I am ready to buy a home?

 

How much home can I afford?

 

How do I make an offer?

 

What is earnest money?  How much should I set aside?

 

What is ‘loan to value’ (LTV) and how does it determine the size of my loan?

 

What types of loans are available and what are the advantages of each?

 

How do I choose the best loan program for me?

 

When do Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) make sense?

 

Can I pay off my loan ahead of schedule?

 

Are there special mortgages for first-time homebuyers? 

 

How large of a down payment do I need?

 

What is included in a monthly mortgage payment?

 

How does the interest rate factor in securing a mortgage loan?

 

What happens if interest rates decrease and I have a fixed-rate loan?

 

What are discount points?

 

What is an escrow account?  Do I need one?

 

What steps need to be taken to secure a loan?

 

How can I find information about my credit history? 

 

What is a credit bureau score and how do lenders use them?

 

What is a good faith estimate and how does it help me?

 

What responsibilities do I have during the lending process? 

 

What happens after I've applied for my loan?

 

What are pre-paid expenses and closing costs?

 

What can I expect on closing day?

 

What do I get at closing?

 

How do I know if I am ready to buy a home?

You are probably ready to buy your own home if you can answer ‘yes’ to these questions:

  • Do I have a steady source of income (usually a job)?
  • Have I been employed on a regular basis for the last 2-3 years?
  • Is my current income reliable? Do I have a good record of paying my bills?
  • Do I have few outstanding long-term debts (like car payments)?
  • Do I have money saved for a down payment?
  • Am I able to pay a mortgage every month, plus additional costs? 

TOP 

 

How much home can I afford?

It's simple.  Ask a Capstone loan officer to pre-qualify you.  When pre-qualifying your loan, we will consider your debt-to-income ratio, which is a comparison of your gross (pre-tax) income to housing and non-housing expenses.  Non-housing expenses include such long-term debts as car or student loan payments and alimony or child support.  According to the FEDERAL HOUSING AUTHORITY (FHA), monthly mortgage payments should be no more than 31% of gross income, while the mortgage payment combined with non-housing expenses should total no more than 43% of your income.  A lender will also consider cash available for down payment, closing costs, and credit history when determining your maximum loan amount.

 

TOP 

 

How do I make an offer?

Your real estate agent will assist you in making an offer, which will include:

  • Complete legal description of the property
  • Amount of earnest money
  • Down payment and financing details
  • Proposed move-in date
  • Price you are offering
  • Proposed closing date
  • Length of time the offer is valid
  • Details of the deal
  • Contingencies such as mortgage and inspections

Success depends on negotiating a satisfactory contract with the seller, not just making an offer.

 

TOP 

 

What is earnest money?  How much should I set aside?

Earnest money is money put down to demonstrate your seriousness about buying a home.  If your offer is accepted, the earnest money becomes part of your down payment or closing costs.  If the offer is rejected, your money is returned to you.  If you back out of a deal, you may forfeit the entire amount.

 

TOP 

 

What is ‘loan to value’ (LTV) and how does it determine the size of my loan?

The loan to value ratio is the amount of money you borrow compared with the price or appraised value of the home you are purchasing.  Each loan has a specific LTV limit.  For example: With a 95% LTV loan on a home priced at $200,000, you could borrow up to $194,000 (97% of $200,000); and would have to pay $6,000 as a down payment.

 

TOP 

 

What types of loans are available and what are the advantages of each?

With a fixed-rate mortgage, the interest rate stays the same during the life of the loan.  With an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), the interest changes periodically, typically in relation to an index.  While the monthly payments that you make with a fixed-rate mortgage are relatively stable, payments on an ARM loan will likely change.  There are advantages and disadvantages to each type of mortgage, and the best way to select a loan product that’s right for you is by talking to a Capstone loan officer.  For a comparison among various loan programs, check out Capstone’s informative chart, Loan Programs.

 

TOP 

 

How do I choose the best loan program for me?

Your personal situation will determine the best kind of loan for you.  Your loan choice depends on a number of factors, including your current financial needs & objectives, and how long you intend to keep your house.  A Capstone Loan officer can help you evaluate your choices and assist you in determining which loan makes the most sense based on your unique requirements.

 

TOP 

 

When do Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) make sense?

An ARM may make sense if:

  • You are confident that your income will increase steadily over the years.
  • You anticipate a move in the near future and aren't concerned about potential increases in interest rates.

TOP 

 

Can I pay off my loan ahead of schedule?

Yes.  By sending more money each month or making an extra payment at the end of the year, you can accelerate the process of paying off the loan.  When you send extra money, be sure to indicate that the excess payment is to be applied to the principal.  Most lenders allow loan prepayment, though you may have to pay a prepayment penalty.  Ask a Capstone Loan officer for details.

 

TOP 

 

Are there special mortgages for first-time homebuyers?

There are several affordable mortgage options which can help first-time homebuyers overcome obstacles.  Capstone frequently assists borrowers who:

  • Don't have a lot of money saved for the down payment and closing costs
  • Have no (or a poor) credit history
  • Have substantial long-term debt
  • Have experienced income irregularities  

TOP 

 

How large of a down payment do I need?

Some mortgage options require a down payment of 3.5% or less of the purchase price.  Remember, the larger the down payment, the less you have to borrow and the more equity you'll have.  Mortgages with less than a 20% down payment generally require a mortgage insurance policy to secure the loan.  When considering the size of your down payment, consider that you'll also need money for closing costs, moving expenses, repairs, and decorating.

 

TOP

 

What is included in a monthly mortgage payment?

The monthly mortgage payment mainly pays off principal and interest.  Typically, your mortgage will also include local real estate taxes, homeowner's insurance, and mortgage insurance (if applicable).

 

TOP 

 

How does the interest rate factor in securing a mortgage loan?

A lower interest rate allows you to borrow more money than a high rate with the same monthly payment.  Interest rates can fluctuate as you shop for a loan, so ask a Capstone Loan officer about a rate ‘lock-in’ (which guarantees a specific interest rate for a certain period of time).  The Annual Percentage Rate (APR) shows the cost of a mortgage loan by expressing it in terms of a yearly interest rate.  The APR is generally higher than the note rate because it also includes the cost of points, mortgage insurance, and other fees included in the loan (but mortgage payments are calculated on the note rate).

 

TOP 

 

What happens if interest rates decrease and I have a fixed-rate loan?

If interest rates drop significantly, you may want to refinance.  Most experts agree that if you plan to be in your house for at least 18 months and you can get a rate 1% less than your current one, refinancing may be a good option.  Refinancing may however, involve paying many of the same fees paid at the original closing, plus origination & application fees.

 

TOP 

 

What are discount points?

Discount points allow you to lower your interest rate.  They are essentially prepaid interest, with each point equaling 1% of the total loan amount.  Generally, for each point paid on a 30-year mortgage, the interest rate is reduced by 1/4 (or .25) of a percentage point.  When shopping for your loan, ask a Capstone Loan officer about an interest rate with zero points and assistance in determining how much the rate decreases with each point paid.  Discount points may make sense if you plan to stay in a home for some time, since they can lower the monthly loan payment.  Points are tax deductible when you purchase a home.  You may be able to negotiate for the seller to pay for a portion of your points.

 

TOP 

 

What is an escrow account?  Do I need one?

Established by your lender, an escrow account is a place to set aside a portion of your monthly mortgage payment to cover annual charges for homeowner's insurance, mortgage insurance (if applicable), and property taxes.  Escrow accounts are a good idea because they assure money will always be available for these payments.

 

TOP 

 

What steps need to be taken to secure a loan? 

The first step in securing a loan is to complete a loan application.  To do so, you'll need the following information or documents:

  • Pay stubs for the past month
  • W-2 forms for the past 2 years
  • Recent bank statements- all pagers of all accounts for the past 2 months
  • Tax returns for the past 2 years
  • Proof of any other income
  • Address and description of the property you wish to buy
  • Sales contract

During the application process, your Capstone Loan officer will order a report on your credit history and a professional appraisal of the property you want to purchase.  The application process typically takes 1-6 weeks.

 

TOP 

 

 

How can I find information about my credit history?

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide consumer reporting companies – Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion – to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months.  The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation's consumer protection agency, has prepared a brochure, Your Access to Free Credit Reports, explaining your rights under the FCRA.

 

 

You can order your free annual credit report online at annualcreditreport.com, by calling 1.877.322.8228, or by completing the Annual Credit Report Request Form and mailing it to:

 

 

Annual Credit Report Request Service
P.O. Box 10528
Atlanta, GA 30348-5281

 

 

Once you receive the report, it's important to verify its accuracy.  Double check the high credit limit’, ‘total loan’, and ‘past due’ columns.  It's a good idea to get copies from all three companies to assure there are no mistakes since any of the three could be providing a report to your lender.

 

 

Contact the credit reporting companies at the numbers listed below for more information:

Experian: 1.888.397.3742
Equifax: 1.800.997.2493
Trans Union: 1.800.888.4213

 

 

 


TOP

 

What is a credit bureau score and how do lenders use them?

A credit bureau score is a number (based upon your credit history) that represents the possibility that you will be unable to repay a loan.  It is used it to determine your ability to qualify for a mortgage loan.  The better the score, the better your chances are of getting a loan.  Ask a Capstone Loan officer for details.

 

TOP 

 

What is a good faith estimate and how does it help me?

It is an estimate that lists all fees paid before closing, all closing costs, and any escrow costs you will encounter when purchasing a home.  Your Capstone Loan officer will supply it within three business days of your application so that you can make accurate judgments when shopping for a loan.

 

TOP 

 

What responsibilities do I have during the lending process?

Be sure to follow all of these steps as you apply for a loan:

  • Read and understand everything before signing
  • Do not overstate income
  • Do not overstate length of employment
  • Do not overstate assets
  • Accurately report debts
  • Do not change your income tax returns for any reason
  • Tell the whole truth about gifts
  • Be truthful about credit problems, past and present
  • Be honest about your intention to occupy the house
  • Do not provide false supporting documents  

TOP 

 

What happens after I've applied for my loan?

Your loan application will be evaluated immediately.  Completing the evaluation of your application usually takes about 4 weeks.  You may be asked for more information once the application has been submitted.  The sooner you can provide the information the faster your application will be processed.  Once all the information has been verified, your Capstone Loan officer will call you to let you know the outcome of your application.  If the loan is approved, a closing date is set up and your Capstone Loan officer will review the closing with you.  After closing, you'll be able to move into your new home!

 

TOP 

 

What are pre-paid expenses and closing costs?

There may be closing costs customary or unique to a certain locality, but closing costs are usually made up of the following:

  • Attorney's or escrow fees
  • Property taxes (to cover tax period to date)
  • Interest (paid from date of closing to 30 days before monthly payment)
  • Loan Origination fee
  • Recording fees
  • Survey fee
  • Title Insurance
  • Loan points (if applicable)
  • First payment to escrow account for future real estate taxes and insurance
  • Lenders fees for underwriting
  • Appraisal fee
  • Credit Report  

TOP 

 

What can I expect on closing day?

You will present your paid homeowner's insurance policy or a binder and receipt showing that the premium has been paid.  The closing agent will then list the money you owe the seller (remainder of down payment, prepaid taxes, etc.) and the money the seller owes you (unpaid taxes and prepaid rent, if applicable).  The seller will provide proofs of any inspection, warranties, etc.

Once you're sure you understand all of the documentation, you'll sign the mortgage, agreeing that if you do not make payments the lender is entitled to sell your property and apply the sale price against the amount you owe plus expenses.  You'll also sign a mortgage note, promising to repay the loan.  The seller will give you the title to the house in the form of a signed deed.

You'll pay the lender's attorney all closing costs and, in turn, he or she will provide you with a settlement statement of all the times for which you have paid.  The deed and mortgage will then be recorded in the state Registry of Deeds and you will be a homeowner.

 

TOP 

 

What do I get at closing?

Settlement Statement, HUD-1 Form is given at or before closing. If you want a copy prior to closing for review, you must request it from the closing agent.

  • A complete package of all papers you signed including copy of the Truth-In Lending Statement
  • Copy of Mortgage Note
  • Copy of Mortgage or Deed of Trust
  • Binding Sales Contract (prepared by the seller; your lawyer should review it)
  • Keys to your new home

TOP

 

Copyright © 2017 Capstone Mortgage Company, Inc.

  NMLS Company ID #1445; MA Broker License #MB1445


Copyright © 2017 Capstone Mortgage Company, Inc.

  NMLS Company ID #1445; MA Broker License #MB1445